Detroit Events

Self Help Festival

Saturday

Oct 7, 2017 – 2:00 PM

14900 Metropolitan Parkway
Sterling Heights, MI 48312 Map

  • Pierce The Veil
  • Rise Against
  • A Day To Remember
  • UNDEROATH

More Info

Pierce The Veil: Pierce the Veil is a San Diego, CA hardcore/post hardcore band formed by brothers Mike and Vic Fuentes with Joe Tancil and Mitchell Balatore. The brothers came into the San Diego hardcore/punk scene when they were in high school with their band Early Times. When the owner of Equal Vision Records saw them at a show in San Diego, the brothers had a record deal right out of high school. They released A Celebration of an Ending under the band name Before Today, changing the name Early Times due to copyright infringement on the beer with the same name.

The band toured heavily after the album's release in 2006, and when they returned the band broke up, leaving Mike and Vic on their own. The duo was still backed by Equal Vision and they continued to write songs until they had enough for their second album, A Flair for the Dramatic. With the new album came a new name: Pierce the Veil. Pierce the Veil also acquired two new members: guitarist Tony Perry and bassist Jamie Preciado.

Pierce the Veil performed a number of concert dates for three months after the album's release, including tour dates on the '07 and '08 Warped Tours and The Delicious Tour, which they headlined. Their third album, Selfish Machines, was released in 2010 and made it to the number one spot on Billboard's Heat Seekers Chart. Following the success of the album, Pierce the Veil embarked on a year's worth of concert dates in 2010, including performances at Bamboozle, South by Southwest, the Take Action Tour with Attack Attack!, and tour dates on the This is a Family Tour, which ended in December of 2010.

In true Pierce the Veil fashion, the band has announced tour dates for 2011 on The Gamechanger's Tour. Concert dates for the 2011 tour will feature quite the line-up of supporting bands, including A Day to Remember, Bring Me the Horizon, and We Came as Romans. While Pierce the Veil hasn't been on the mainstream music scene for long, they are definitely on the rise and will put on a concert date that fans won't soon forget. Be sure to catch the tour dates in 2011 so that you can say "I knew them when."

Rise Against: Fans who are planning to attend their first Rise Against tour date in 2011 might be surprised to find how deeply the band's roots are planted in punk culture. Before the current incarnation of the band: Tim McIlrath was with punk band Baxter, bassist Joe Principe was originally with 88 Fingers Louie, and Dan Lumley of Screeching Weasel filled in on drums for a short while. Rise Against even signed with LA punk icon Fat Mike's record label Fat Wreck Chords in their early days, before they hit the mainstream with Siren Song of the Counter Culture. While the album broke into the Billboard 200, it marked a move from the traditional punk that had launched McIlrath and Principe's careers towards a more "melodic" hardcore sound. It is this signature sound that has already sold out several tour dates in 2011.

Rise Against used the popularity of their breakout album to embark on a rigorous concert schedule in 2005, including the Taste of Chaos tour, The Leeds Festival, and the Warped Tour. Even with such a hectic concert schedule the band was able to release The Sufferer & the Witness, which brought Rise Against back to their punk roots. By 2006 the success of the album had made the band headliner of Warped Tour concert dates that year, and they shared some of that fame by opening for My Chemical Romance at the onset of their concert schedule. It was also around this time that Chris Chasse left the band due to the innumerable tour dates, and was replaced by Zach Blair.

Immediately after the replacement, Rise Against once again went on tour dates until Appeal to Reason was released in 2008. The album received mixed reviews, with critics now claiming it was too mainstream and strayed from their punk roots once again. Fans of the album attributed the change to the ever-present pop influence in society, and that the songs themselves were strong and well-written.

Rise Against's new album, Endgame, is a blending of their melodic riffs and screeching guitars, which should please fans on both sides. While McIlrath claims the album is not a concept album, many of the songs deal with serious worldwide events such as Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill. Rise Against has been promoting the album on a South American and European concert tour, but will return to the US with tour dates starting on April 5 before heading back to Europe. Many tour dates are already sold out, including the Long Beach show which will feature popular punk band Descendents; their first time playing in fourteen years. Rise Against will be joined by Bad Religion and Four Year Strong on the remainder of the tour, so fans are advised to buy tickets soon.

A Day To Remember: A Day to Remember took a while to reach acclaim and headlining tour dates, mostly because the band is a true DIY success story. The band worked tirelessly to promote themselves and beg to play concert dates before hitting it big, but all the hard work paid off for this metalcore/pop punk band. "Metalcore slash pop punk?" you may cry. While many bands blend elements of the two into their music, A Day to Remember has both hard, screaming metal songs as well as melodic pop punk songs, all on the same album! After years of playing small concert dates that they painstakingly set up themselves, A Day to Remember is headlining a number of tour dates in 2011, including concert dates with Bring Me the Horizon and a headlining spot on Warped Tour dates in 2011.

The band was formed in 2003 in Ocala, Florida, by Neil Westfall (rhythm guitar), Tom Denney (lead guitar), Joshua Woodard (bass), and Bobby Scruggs (drums), after all being in separate local bands. The group scraped together some songs and embarked on a 200-concert date DIY tour. The band was soon signed to Indianola Records and their debut album, And Their Name Was Treason, was released in 2005.

Shortly after signing with Victory, the band replaced drummer Bobby Scruggs with Alex Shellnutt and headed to the studios to record For Those Who Have Heart. The album was released in January 2007 and broke into indie and newcomer charts almost immediately. With the success of the album, A Day to Remember embarked on a number of mainstream tour dates, including performances at Bamboozle Left and Right in 2008 and concert dates on the 2008 Warped Tour. In 2008, A Day to Remember embarked on a series of concert dates across Australia with Parkway Drive, both bands enjoying the success that hardcore music was bringing them. Even with constant concert dates, the group found time to record their third album, Homesick, released at the end of 2008.

In June 2009, lead guitarist Tom Denney left the band to focus on his family and his burgeoning recording career. Despite being replaced by Kevin Skaff (formerly of label-mate Four Letter Lie), Denney has contributed to A Day to Remember's new material as a writer. Following Denney's departure, A Day to Remember played their first headlining tour dates in September, 2009, joining up with Parkway Drive again on The Pulling Your Pud Tour. A Day to Remember's latest album is What Separates Me From You, released in 2010, which has brought the band even more mainstream success.

After extensively touring in promotion of the album, A Day to Remember performed even more tour dates in 2011 for their What Separates Me From You Tour. A Day to Remember also has a number of concert dates planned for South America starting June 7 and ending on June 12, right before they head back stateside. A Day to Remember will canvass the US with concert dates yet again before ending their 2011 tour dates. With so many chances to catch A Day to Remember with other great metal acts, fans should check Eventful's schedule to see when the band is coming to their area.

UNDEROATH: Very rarely does a monumental record find itself matched with the promise of commercial success. But the strength, intensity and explosive lure of “Define The Great Line” Underoath’s follow up to its over 350,000 selling 2004 breakthrough They’re Only Chasing Safety--is undeniable.

“We went into the studio wanting to make this record count,” says guitarist Tim McTague. “We wanted to make it life-changing for the people who heard it. We knew it had the potential to do well, but we weren’t basing our future on that. We feel we’ve written the best album that any of us will probably ever be a part of and above all else, we’re super proud of it.”

Crafted with the help of Atlanta-based producer/drummer Matt Goldman–who helped pour the rhythmic foundation–and Killswitch Engage guitarist Adam Dutkiewicz–who lent his experience to help capture the guitars and vocals and encouraged these Warped Tour veterans to use E-bows, reel bows and experiment with delays and effects pedals–the resulting “Define The Great Line” is a mind-blowing song-cycle that resets the notion of what hardcore, screamo or whatever you want to call it, can be.

“We didn’t want to take the normal approach, with just two guitar tracks, drum tracks, vocal tracks or whatever,” McTague explains. “We really made an effort to expand in our minds about what Underoath could do.” To which founding kitman Aaron Gillespie adds, “We couldn’t be happier. When I look back on the time we spent on this album, I don’t think we would have done anything different.”

If “A Moment Suspended In Time” is the most direct, heartfelt musical assault since At The Drive-In’s “One Armed Scissor”–replete with explosive drumming and the inexplicably delightful amalgam of mayhem and melody–the Florida-based sextet’s depth and ability is no doubt bolstered by its higher calling.

“I feel like I want people to know we’re a Christian band,” vocalist Spencer Chamberlain says of Unederoath’s collective devotion. “But at the same time I don’t like tacking God or the fact that we’re Christian onto something to sell more records. I don’t want just to be marketed as a Christian band because I think we go beyond that. Tags can be limiting.”

“For us it’s a fear of stereotype,” Gillespie explains. “Like, ‘You’re Christian, so you can’t be my friend.’ I mean, Jesus was at lunch with whores and hookers! Still, our Christianity defines who we are.”

And for Underoath–which also counts keyboardist Chris Dudley, bassist Grant Brandell and guitarist James Smith–there’s a purpose in the music, be it the cathartic, introspective “You’re Ever So Inviting” or the intoxicatingly forceful “In Regards To Myself.” The latter opens the album with equal parts conviction and commotion, and boasts Spencer’s bloodcurdling inquiry, “What are you so afraid of?” only to be countered by a stunning, turn-on-a-dime harmony.

“With this record I just wrote about myself and my life,” Chamberlain says proudly. “On They’re Only Chasing Safety, I wrote about scenarios because I had only recently joined the band and I was still adapting to the situation. This time there were no limitations and I’m writing about the stuff that I know and feel strongly about. And because I’m emotionally invested in it, I think it just feels right.” A listen to the deeply personal, “There Could Be Nothing After This,” an inventive, experimental blast of guitars and inner searching affirms this sentiment.

“Our last record was like, ten songs on a CD,” Tim says. “And you could go and listen to each song individually to decide what you like or you don’t. But this is the first time we composed an album. In the past it was just the ten or so songs we wrote in a garage and recorded and eventually some kids bought it. This time we knew we didn’t want to regurgitate anything. It had to be cohesive.”

If the stakes felt high after the group became Tooth & Nail’s best selling band, the men of Underoath kept their focus and avoided the stresses that have sabotaged so many follow up discs. “Pressure is only there if you buy into it,” Aaron says. “As long as we were going where we wanted to go and we were making it unique, that’s all that mattered.”

Or as Tim succinctly puts it, “We don’t need to pump out ten singles for an album. We’re not Fall Out Boy. Those bands are great for what they are but that’s not what we’re aspiring to be at all.”

“We wanted to provoke a lot of thought lyrically and musically,” McTague continues. “We didn’t want it to be a record that you put in and you’re instantly hooked because those records fall off. Catchy hooks seem cool for about a week, but then--when you’re sick of it, you realize there is no substance. You can throw the record away. We’d rather be a band like Refused, At The Drive-In or Glassjaw, where you listen to it and you like it but you don’t really get it immediately. But you keep listening to it and all the little pieces come into focus.”

As for clarity regarding the disc’s title, Spencer says, “I liked how broad it is. ‘Define The Great Line’ can be interpreted so many different ways. When we all started in our various bands we were a bunch of 18-year-old kids. Over the last two years I’ve watched us grow into the kind of men we’re going to be. To me it’s the way I feel. It’s the way God has called me to be. It’s just an imaginary line that I try to balance myself on to be the best person I can be. I’ve made tons of mistakes and I’m just an idiot kid sometimes and it may take me my entire life to be the person that I aspire to be, but that’s my goal: To be the best kind of dude I can be.”

And if it’s that spirit that sets Underoath’s fierce, foot-stomping metallic drive (see “Returning Empty Handed”) apart from its peers, perhaps McTague puts it best when he talks about the real rewards of being in one of the biggest genre- defining bands today. “For me, the kids that we meet at shows who come up to us and tell us, ‘I was going to kill myself and then I heard this song of yours that changed my life around spiritually.’ Or even the one who said, ‘I had no one to turn to when my parents divorced, but your record got me through it.’ That’s what it’s all about for me. That’s what makes us more than just some crappy rock band.”

Message received. “Define The Great Line” is indeed one of 2006’s defining musical moments.

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